Category Archives: Uncategorized

CLOSE OUT MARBLE AND GRANITE SLAB SALE

FOR NOVEMBER 1- December 31, 2017

 

All 2cm slabs $11.50 square foot

All 3cm slabs $16.00 square foot

C.O.D. picked up in our warehouse

We have the following materials to choose from:

Verde Acceglio 2 and 3 cm

Bardiglio 2cm and 3cm

White Marbles 2cm, 3cm and 5cm ($21.00 square foot)

Mocha Cream 2cm, 3cm and 5cm ($21.00 square foot)

Onyx 2cm

Various Other materials please call for more information and appointment 914-668-8561 ask for Debbie

McGinley Center Fordham University

 

The stations of the Cross and carvings were found in a Jesuit Monistary in Shrub Oak, NY which later became the Phoenix house. The property was recently sold and the marble carvings were a gift to Fordham University. Petrillo Stone dismantled, warehoused, stored, restored and installed at McGinley hall Fordham University Rose Hill campus. This project was overseen by both Ralph and Frank Petrillo from Petrillo Stone Corp Mount Vernon, NY.

The Marble House

Marble HouseHave you visited the museum at Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island? Now open to the public, the building is a landmark in American architecture and still strikingly beautiful.

Marble House was built as a summer home between 1888 and 1892 for Alva and William Kissam Vanderbilt. While summer homes in the area were traditionally wooden, Marble House marked the transition to the now well-known stone palace. Alva Vanderbilt was known in society for her flare as a hostess, and it’s said that she saw Marble House as a “temple to the arts”.

According to the website, “The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present.”

Marble House is one of the earliest examples of Beaux-Arts architecture in the U.S. The building is U-shaped, and consists of four stories although it only appears to be two from the outside. The load-bearing section of the walls are made of brick, and the entire exterior of the building is Westchester marble. Not surprisingly, this gorgeous property as also appeared in several films and television series.

For more about Marble House and the lifestyles of the rich at the turn of the century, visit the Preservation Society of Newport County’s website.

Inventory Sale

Petrillo Stone Corporation would like to announce a special offering for you:

We are currently over-stocked in a large variety of stone slabs and pieces, and need to liquidate this stock to make room in our warehouse.  Because of this, we are greatly discounting the prices on our current inventory and passing this saving to you.

Our currently inventory includes all different types of products ranging from:

Marble Granite Blue Stone
Lime Stone Travertine Onyx

Plus other Natural Stone in a variety of sizes (slabs and pieces), colors, and thicknesses, and all are priced to move quickly. Discounts Range from 30% to 50% off normal pricing with additional discounts available for larger quantity purchases.

Appointments are available on a first come, first serve basis and are filling up fast:

Weekdays:  8:30am – 3:30pm Monday – Fridays

Weekends:  Available by appointment only

To make your appointment, contact Debbie Santoro at

914-668-8561 (or email at mailto:dsantoro@petrillostone.com)

Petrillo Stone Corporation Commences Its 109th Year

 

The following is from a press release published by Petrillo Stone Corporation:


A 109-Year-Old Stone & Installation Company Refuses to Get Stuck in the Stone Age

Petrillo Stone Corporation OwnersGuided by founder A.T. Petrillo’s grandsons, Frank R. Petrillo and Ralph E. Petrillo, Petrillo Stone Corporation, a leader in natural stone supply and installation, is heading into its 109th year in business.  The New York based company first opened in 1907 and has worked on a number of recognizable projects, including 11 Madison Avenue, Fordham University, and the Verizon Building (formerly known as the AT&T Building).

“We’ve been involved in high end projects for as long as I can remember,” Ralph Petrillo said.  “One of my first memories is when my father and uncle (John Petrillo and August Petrillo) had taken the contract for the fabrication of the travertine for Lincoln Center in NYC in our shop back in the 1960’s.”

While the fabrication shop has been located at the same location since 1926, not everything is quite the same as it used to be.

“Back in the old days, nothing was brought in cut-to-size from abroad. Everything we installed was pretty much fabricated in our shop,” Ralph Petrillo said. “Now, much of the material is fabricated in other areas and abroad, and when that’s the case, we are still field measuring and doing shop drawings in-house before we install the finished product.”

Petrillo Stone Corporation is still supplying and installing natural stone to high end-projects, which include fabricating the Indiana limestone for the New York Life Insurance Building, supplying stone to St. Patrick’s Cathedral for a restoration project, and working on a new lobby at 90 Park Avenue. Some of the stones for these projects require real craftsmanship and are hand carved in our shop. Besides being very intricately carved, many of those stones weigh over a thousand pounds each.

“We’ve been blessed with a terrific reputation within the stone industry. Our shop can replicate any stone, no matter how fancy or how big. Being able to change with the times is very important as well and finally, it doesn’t hurt to have a little luck on your side.”

 

Canadian Museum Exhibit Sheds Light on Freemasons

masonic squareWe’ve all heard of the freemasons, a society dating back to the 1700’s known for its secret ways and famous members. Henry Ford has actually been confirmed as a member of this fraternity.

Freemasonry is traced back to Scotland, England and France in the middle ages. Men would form stone mason guilds to train others on how to properly construct buildings. Through the guilds, they would encourage a high quality of workmanship from members. The men would share insider tips, which eventually became protected by memberships and passwords. Perhaps the most intriguing part of freemasonry is the fact that freemasons often frown upon taking credit or bragging.

Because freemasons remain so tight-lipped about member rituals, many have mustered a suspicion toward the group. However, a travelling exhibit created by the Bruce County Museum & Cultural Center in Southampton, Ontario is promoting understanding and appreciation for Masonic history and its influence on society. This exhibit is titled “Freemasonry: A History Hidden in Plain Sight,”and is described as follows:

This exhibit informs the public, arouses curiosity and promotes learning about Freemasonry’s heritage and cultural identities.  Freemasonry contributes to communities in a number of ways through the unspoken and invisible act of helping those in need.  Inspired by, and with enormous assistance from, our local Masonic Lodges, this exhibit attracted a very high shoulder-season audience to our facility in the spring of 2011.  Local Masonic Lodges in the area of your museum may wish to take advantage of the increased profile brought to Freemasonry through recent books and movies to assist you to ensure that your community has access to the Freemasons’ story that’s “hidden in plain sight.”  Inclusion of artifacts from your partner Lodge makes this exhibit appealing to locavores.

Although Ontario may be a long trip for most of us, consider contacting the museum to see if the exhibit will be travelling near you. This is an interesting part of history that we don’t often have the opportunity to explore.

Ponte Rotto: The Bridge to Nowhere

1024px-Roma-ponterotto01You’re probably familiar with the great architecture of Rome, like the Colosseum and the Pantheon. Millions of tourists flock to the city each year just to catch a glimpse of these great works. However, you may not have heard of the Ponte Rotto, or broken bridge.

Originally named the Pons Aemilius, it was built in 179 B.C. and is one of the only remaining examples of Roman Republican architecture. It was constructed to connect the cattle farm on the eastern bank with Trastevere on the western bank. However, no one has been able to cross it since Christmas Eve 1598, when floods carried the eastern part away.

Ancient Stone Masonry in the Ponte Rotto

What was really remarkable, though, was that it was one of the first stone Roman bridges. At the time, bridges were wooden and entirely supported on timber piles. Instead, the Pons Aemilius was constructed of a wooden roadbed, supported by five stone pillars.

The stone used was locally quarrified volcanic tufa, a form of volcanic ash. The stone was laid in ashlar masonry style, or an interlocking style of horizontal and vertical slabs set in parallel courses. To learn about the construction of the Pons Aemilius, more famously known as the Ponte Rotto, you can check out this detailed article by The Wall Street Journal.

The Ponte Rotto has a rich history of rebuilding and reconstruction, and has been witness to major events in Roman history. Throughout it all, it’s been a reminder of the past and a point of interest for artists through the ages.

Philadelphia City Hall: One of the World’s Largest All-Masonry Buildings

Philadelphia_City_Hall_at_nightIf you’ve ever been downtown in Philadelphia, there’s no question that you’ve noticed City Hall. The remarkable, French Renaissance-style building is breathtaking and easily identifiable, thanks to William Penn gracing the structure’s top.

You may also know that when plans for construction began in 1871, City Hall was intended to be the tallest structure in the world at 548 feet tall. Unfortunately, construction of the Eiffel Tower  and Washington Monument ruined that dream before City Hall’s construction ended. However, neither of those structures were used as buildings so Philadelphia’s City Hall remained the world’s tallest occupied building until 1909, when the Metropolitan Life Building was built in New York.

Traditional Stone Masonry

The reason that City Hall still strikes us at Petrillo Stone Corporation as legendary is the fact that is an all-masonry, load bearing building — and still one of the largest in the world. Most of the seemingly stone buildings we see today actually have a support frame built of steel and iron. This building, however, is made of brick and covered in white marble and granite. It has walls up to 22 feet thick at the base to support its immense weight.

Because this type of construction is so time-consuming and expensive, most designers have virtually abandoned load-bearing structures over the last century. City Hall took 30 years and over 24 million dollars to complete. This is a beautiful example of pure stone masonry that has rightfully earned its spot as the center of a historic city.

The Washington Monument Reopened

washington monumentThe following is a post we’ve shared from our other Petrillo Stone website:

In August 2011, a 5.8 magnitude earthquake rocked Washington D.C. and caused over 150 structural cracks to the 130-year-old Washington Monument. At 555 feet tall, the stone symbol required extensive, careful repair that cost around $15 million. In fact, teams worked on scaffolding for nearly 1,000 days to better work stone by stone.

Construction of the Washington Monument began in 1848 to honor our nation’s first president. On July 4th of that year, a team began to assemble the 80-foot square step pyramid foundation made of blue gneiss. They then used a system of pulleys to create a marble, obelisk structure roughly 156 feet off the ground by 1854. After architect Robert Mills died in 1855, the monument remained half finished for almost two decades. Building resumed in 1876, although builders had issues finding matching stone and incorporated stone and marble from three different quarries. Actually, three distinct stone patterns can still be seen by the naked eye today…

For the full post, visit PetrilloStone.net.