Author Archives: Boom Visibility

Fund in Place to Repair Burned Stone Building in Glacier National Park

Sperry ChaletSperry Chalet in Glacier National Park in Columbia Falls, MT, requires many costly repairs. The century old building burned in the Sprague Fire on August 31, 2017.

The Great Northern Railway opened Sperry Chalet in 1914, along with a handful of other lodges. Before it burned, Sperry Chalet was one of only two remaining lodges.

Sperry Chalet was a refuge for tired hikers who had to complete a difficult, 6.7 mile hike to reach the chalet. Locally quarried stone lined the walls inside the much-loved dining room, where visitors enjoyed roasts, pies, and breakfast foods.

The two-story masonry building situated on a bed of rock in the backwoods was an icon to visitors as well as those of us in the industry.

The Aftermath of the Fire

The roof and woodwork inside the building has vanished, along with the dormitory portion of the building. Even though much of the building has burned away, the kitchen and dining room may be salvageable.

Since the day after the fire, the Glacier Conservancy has been working with the park’s superintendent, Jeff Mow, to establish a plan of action to revitalize the Sperry Chalet.

The conservancy hired an engineering firm to evaluate the remaining structure, and they stressed that it needs to be stabilized before the winter.

The Sperry Action Fund is currently in need of more donations. Click here to read the full story.

The Marble House

Marble HouseHave you visited the museum at Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island? Now open to the public, the building is a landmark in American architecture and still strikingly beautiful.

Marble House was built as a summer home between 1888 and 1892 for Alva and William Kissam Vanderbilt. While summer homes in the area were traditionally wooden, Marble House marked the transition to the now well-known stone palace. Alva Vanderbilt was known in society for her flare as a hostess, and it’s said that she saw Marble House as a “temple to the arts”.

According to the website, “The house was designed by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, inspired by the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The cost of the house was reported in contemporary press accounts to be $11 million, of which $7 million was spent on 500,000 cubic feet of marble. Upon its completion, Mr. Vanderbilt gave the house to his wife as a 39th birthday present.”

Marble House is one of the earliest examples of Beaux-Arts architecture in the U.S. The building is U-shaped, and consists of four stories although it only appears to be two from the outside. The load-bearing section of the walls are made of brick, and the entire exterior of the building is Westchester marble. Not surprisingly, this gorgeous property as also appeared in several films and television series.

For more about Marble House and the lifestyles of the rich at the turn of the century, visit the Preservation Society of Newport County’s website.

Selecting Stone Blocks from the Lincoln Quarry

We recently flew out to Colorado to pick out blocks for our current project at the Knickerbocker Club in New York. In the gallery below, you can see pictures of Ralph Petrillo with the architectural team, the owner’s representative, the fabricator and the installer of the project. The Rocky Mountains are visible in the background.

The Lincoln Quarry is an underground quarry, which is unusual as most quarries are above ground. It is so named as it was the source for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.

The Story of Stone

Have you ever wondered about the journey that natural stone takes before it is used in a building or furniture? The truth is, the stone’s travels are quite impressive. In a previous blog post, we told you about Frank and Ralph Petrillo’s trip to Italy where they visited the quarry from which Petrillo Stone Corporation sources much of its stone. A recent article on Dwell told a similar story, and we just had to share.

This article tells the story behind a Saarinen marble table top, from quarry, to the Knoll Inc factory, to the home or office. The story gives you an appreciation for this type of craftsmanship as well as the high quality products. Read the full story on Dwell.

Below, find some photos from the quarry in Italy that Frank and Ralph visited.

Petrillo Stone Corporation Celebrates 80 Years of Work with Fordham University

 A Business Relationship that Stands the Test of Time

Fordham University SealFamily-owned, New York-based stone company Petrillo Stone Corporation is celebrating the 80th anniversary of its business relationship with another respected New York institution – Fordham University. As part of that celebration, the team at Petrillo Stone recently carved and installed a new 16 ft. Fordham University seal and accompanying lettering in 23 karat gold leaf at the Lincoln Center Campus.

The relationship between Fordham University and Petrillo Stone Corp. dates way back to the deep dark depths of the Great Depression. In 1936, company founder Antonio Petrillo (A.T. Petrillo Company at the time) took the contract to fabricate all the cut limestone work for Keating Hall, at the Rose Hill Campus. This was a huge undertaking. The majority of the finished work was hand carved and all of the work was fabricated in the shop in Mount Vernon, NY. Keating Hall would be the first of many projects that generations of Petrillos would be handling for Fordham University.

In fact, Antonio’s son, John Petrillo, recounted many years after the completion of Keating Hall to his own son Ralph, “that job is what got our company through the Great Depression.”

In the years after the completion, Petrillo Stone Corporation has continued to replace pieces of limestone for Keating Hall due to acid rain or the shifting of the building. The family-owned business has completed other notable projects for Fordham University over the last 80 years, using the same traditional craftsmanship exemplified by founder Antonio.

“I can only speak for the 38 years I have been at Fordham for the consistently high standard of both product and service we have received from Petrillo Stone. Petrillo takes our ideas and translates them into workable designs executed to perfection at both our campuses,” said Brian J Byrne, Vice President for Lincoln Center Campus.

The above is an excerpt from a recent press release. Find the full article here.

Fordham University Seal Carving

In our last post, we described some of the work we’d been contracted by Fordham University to complete. In addition to those carvings, we’ve been working on a new seal for the Lincoln Center Campus. You can find photos of this work in the gallery below. All artwork is owned by Fordham University.

Petrillo Stone at the Old Phoenix House

Petrillo Stone WorkPetrillo Stone was contracted to remove some beautiful art work out of the old Phoenix House in Mohegan Lake, New York.

There were 14 carved marble stations of the cross, 4 carved marble carvings of Ignatius Loyola depicting his life, marble carvings of Jesus and Mary, a bronze and wood sculpture of Jesus on the cross ( shown below ), as well as another marble carving of St. Ignatius Loyola.

We were contracted to do this work by Fordham University, who owns all the art work. In the above photo, Ralph Petrillo is pictured on the left with John Spaccarelli of Fordham University (middle ) and our friend who transported some of the art work to the shop. Before the building was Phoenix House, it was a Jesuit monastery built in 1954.

Petrillo Stone Corporation Commences Its 109th Year

 

The following is from a press release published by Petrillo Stone Corporation:


A 109-Year-Old Stone & Installation Company Refuses to Get Stuck in the Stone Age

Petrillo Stone Corporation OwnersGuided by founder A.T. Petrillo’s grandsons, Frank R. Petrillo and Ralph E. Petrillo, Petrillo Stone Corporation, a leader in natural stone supply and installation, is heading into its 109th year in business.  The New York based company first opened in 1907 and has worked on a number of recognizable projects, including 11 Madison Avenue, Fordham University, and the Verizon Building (formerly known as the AT&T Building).

“We’ve been involved in high end projects for as long as I can remember,” Ralph Petrillo said.  “One of my first memories is when my father and uncle (John Petrillo and August Petrillo) had taken the contract for the fabrication of the travertine for Lincoln Center in NYC in our shop back in the 1960’s.”

While the fabrication shop has been located at the same location since 1926, not everything is quite the same as it used to be.

“Back in the old days, nothing was brought in cut-to-size from abroad. Everything we installed was pretty much fabricated in our shop,” Ralph Petrillo said. “Now, much of the material is fabricated in other areas and abroad, and when that’s the case, we are still field measuring and doing shop drawings in-house before we install the finished product.”

Petrillo Stone Corporation is still supplying and installing natural stone to high end-projects, which include fabricating the Indiana limestone for the New York Life Insurance Building, supplying stone to St. Patrick’s Cathedral for a restoration project, and working on a new lobby at 90 Park Avenue. Some of the stones for these projects require real craftsmanship and are hand carved in our shop. Besides being very intricately carved, many of those stones weigh over a thousand pounds each.

“We’ve been blessed with a terrific reputation within the stone industry. Our shop can replicate any stone, no matter how fancy or how big. Being able to change with the times is very important as well and finally, it doesn’t hurt to have a little luck on your side.”

 

Feature Wall and Side Wall at 90 Park Avenue

Below are pictures of a feature wall and side wall that we furnished and installed in the lobby at 90 Park Avenue. The stone is Travertine unfilled from Tivoli, right outside of Rome. This project is one of the reasons that Ralph Petrillo went to Italy numerous times this year. The material was purchased from Carlo Mariotti in Tivoli. Petrillo Stone Corp. drafted it, had it cut at Mariotti, and brought it over in a container. The stone was brought to our shop in Mount Vernon, laid out to make sure it was dry, and installed in the lobby.

The desk (seen behind Ralph Petrillo in photo) is hand-selected Agata Gray marble from Carrara, Italy, supplied to Petrillo Stone by Armando Santucci. The architect is Dan Shannon, whom Ralph traveled with to Italy many times in the past year for the selection process. The contractor is Tishman Construction and the building owner is Vornado.

We are very proud of this work and hope you enjoy the photo gallery shared below. If you’re in the area, be sure to stop by and take in the beauty of this hand-selected Italian stone in person.

Petrillo Stone Corp Travels to Italy

Co-owners Frank and Ralph Petrillo recently took a trip to Italy to attend the Stone Expo in Verona. While there, they also met with a stone supplier in Rome and managed to fit in some sight-seeing. Not only were the pair able to meet with some of the leaders in stone masonry, they were also able to visit some of the architecture that inspires much of their work.

See below for a gallery of photos from the trip: